Giersch International Symposion

Date

Lecture Program: September 26-30, 2016

Topic

Cosmic Matter and Quantum Gravity

Agenda

  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Sept. 26 Sept. 27 Sept. 28 Sept. 29 Sept. 30
 
09:00-10:30
 
  Lecture Series A
Rezzolla - Lecture II
FIAS Lecture Hall
---
Lecture Series E
Weinheimer - Lecture I
OSZ Lecture Hall HS6
Lecture Series D
Fodor - Lecture I
OSZ Lecture Hall HS6
---
Lecture Series E
Weinheimer - Lecture III
FIAS Lecture Hall
Lecture Series B
Stock
Lecture II
FIAS Lecture Hall
Lecture Series B
Stock
Lecture III
FIAS Lecture Hall
10:30-11:00 Break Break Break Break Break
 
11:00-12:30
 
  Lecture Series A
Rezzolla - Group Project II
FIAS Lecture Hall
---
Lecture Series E
Weinheimer - Group Project I
OSZ Lecture Hall HS6
Lecture Series D
Fodor - Group Project I
OSZ Lecture Hall HS6
---
Lecture Series E
Weinheimer - Group Project III
FIAS Lecture Hall
Lecture Series B
Stock
Group Project II
FIAS Lecture Hall
Lecture Series B
Stock
Group Project III
FIAS Lecture Hall
 
12:30-14:00
 
Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch
 
14:00-15:30
 
Lecture Series A
Rezzolla
Lecture I
FIAS Lecture Hall
Lecture Series A
Rezzolla - Lecture III
FIAS Lecture Hall
---
Lecture Series E
Weinheimer - Lecture II
OSZ Lecture Hall HS6
Lecture Series B
Stock
Lecture I
FIAS Lecture Hall
Lecture Series C
Reinefeld - Lecture I
FIAS Faculty Club
---
Lecture Series D
Fodor - Lecture II
FIAS Lecture Hall
Lecture Series D
Fodor
Lecture III
OSZ Lecture Hall HS6
15:30-16:00 Break Break Break Break Break
 
16:00-17:00
 
Lecture Series A
Rezzolla
Group Project I
FIAS Lecture Hall
Lecture Series A
Rezzolla - Group Project III
FIAS Lecture Hall
---
Lecture Series E
Weinheimer - Group Project II
OSZ Lecture Hall HS6
Lecture Series B
Stock
Group Project I
FIAS Lecture Hall
Lecture Series C
Reinefeld - Lecture II
FIAS Faculty Club
---
Lecture Series D
Fodor - Group Project II
FIAS Lecture Hall
Lecture Series D
Fodor
Group Project III
OSZ Lecture Hall HS6
 
17:15-17:30
 
Special Lecture
't Hooft
OSZ Lecture Hall HS6
(17:15-18:15)
 
17:30-18:30
 
Symposion's Lounge Symposion's Lounge Social Event
Museum Giersch
 
 
18:30-19:00
 
Arrival
 
19:00-20:00
 
Ceremonial Act
Senior FIAS Fellow Laureatus
FIAS Lecture Hall
 
20:00-
 
Reception

Lecturer Series

  • Lecture Series A: Gravitational Waves and Neutron Stars

    Prof. Dr. Luciano Rezzolla

    I will ultimately discuss how the detection of gravitational waves through the inspiral and merger of two neutron stars can be used to extract fundamental information in physics and astrophysics. A number of basic notions are neede to reach this conclusion and so the lectures will be organised as follows: 1) A brief review of general relativity and gravitational waves; 2) A brief introduction to 3+1 decomposition and numerical relativity; 3) A brief review of relativity hydrodynamics 4) An overview of the physics and astrophysics of binary neutron stars.

  • Lecture Series B: Quantum Chromodynamics: Matter in the Big Bang and in the Laboratory

    Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Reinhard Stock

    I will describe the origin of our present matter from a phase transition in the early universe, where an era of matter composed of free quarks and gluons ended in converting to bound hadrons (like protons and neutrons). This transition can be described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), and modern experiments that collide heavy nuclei at synchrotron/collider laboratories at the highest presently attainable energies have given access to the properties predicted by QCD thermodynamics, and opened up a deeper understanding of matter under governance of QCD, and of QCD field theory itself.

  • Lecture Series C: Parallel Computing and Big Data

    Prof. Dr. Alexander Reinefeld

    With terabytes of data to be processed in modern data analytics applications, the old paradigm of sequential processing is over. It is essential to move to parallel programming models to serve the needs of big data applications. But which programming model should be used for a given problem? And how can the potential of multi- and many-core systems be exploited for big data applications?

    In our lecture, we present theoretical models for parallel computation and data management, and we discuss their application to practical software systems. Keywords are: scalability, fault-tolerance, storage technology, key-value stores, cloud file systems, memory hierarchy, memory allocators, MapReduce, thread programming, message passing.

  • Lecture Series D: Lattice QCD

    Prof. Dr. Zoltan Fodor

    The basics of quantum field theory will be summarized and a few examples will be shown. After generic features of quantum field theories we will discuss the lattice implementations. Special emphasis is made for scalar fields (Higgs) and for the strong interactions (QCD). For the latter both thermodynamics and zero temperature physics will be discussed.

  • Lecture Series E: Neutrino Physics

    Prof. Dr. Christian Weinheimer

    The discovery of neutrino oscillations - awarded with the Nobel prize in physics in 2015 - has opened the very interesting field of neutrino mixing and masses making neutrinos to be very important players in astrophysics and cosmology as well as in nuclear and particle physics. This series of lectures on neutrino physics will start with a short summary of neutrinos in the Standard Model of particle physics followed by a presentation of the discovery of neutrino oscillation and an overview on todays findings in neutrino oscillations. The connection of neutrino masses to cosmology and astrophysics as well as the search for neutrino masses and lepton flavor violation in the neutrino sector will be presented in the third chapter of the lectures. Finally, the discovery of astrophysical neutrinos with large neutrino telescopes will be discussed.

Special Lecture

  • Black holes and their role in fundamental particle physics

    Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Gerard 't Hooft

    When Karl Schwarzschild published his solution to Einstein’s equations for grav- ity, it turned out that this solution describes the gravitational eld of a black hole. The size that characterizes a black hole can range from billions of kilometers to in nitesimally tiny, and the mass then varies accordingly. In principle, black holes can be as small and almost as light as elementary particles, but when we try to apply the rules of quantum mechanics to black holes, this seems to lead to paradoxical behavior. To get particles and black holes under one denominator, it seems that the laws of space, time and matter need a thorough revision. Some aspects of this revision of space and time can be deduced, but still many mys- teries remain. It is suspected that more understanding should help us to unify the elementary particles and forces.

Lecturers

  1. Prof. Dr. Luciano Rezzolla

    L. Rezzolla is a relativistic astrophysicist, i.e., a physicist who uses Einstein's theory of general relativity to describe and explain high-energy astronomical observations of black holes and neutron stars. He is chair of the (New)CompStar collaboration and in 2014 was awarded a Synergy Grant from the European Research Council (ERC).

  2. Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Reinhard Stock

    R. Stock is one of the pioneers of relativistic heavy ion experiments. He has been spokesperson of the NA49 experiment at CERN for many years. He is a laureat of the Leibniz-Preis (1989) and the Lise-Meitner-Preis (2008).

  3. Prof. Dr. Alexander Reinefeld

    A. Reinefeld is Director of the Zuse Institute Berlin and Professor for Parallel and Distributed Systems at the Humboldt University of Berlin. His research interests are in parallel computing, distributed algorithms and innovative computer architecture.

  4. Prof. Dr. Zoltan Fodor

    Z. Fodor was working at CERN, DESY, KEK and University of Budapest before moving to University of Wuppertal in 2003. He is considered one of the world leading experts in the field of lattice QCD.

  5. Prof. Dr. Christian Weinheimer

    C. Weinheimer is Co-Spokesman of the KATRIN experiment at KIT aiming to determine the neutrino mass. Furthermore he is involved with the search for dark matter with the XENON experiment at the LNGS underground laboratory and the development of photon detectors in the SPARC collaboration at FAIR.

Senior FIAS Fellow Laureatus

Prof. Dr. Dr. hc mult Gerard 't Hooft

G. 't Hooft was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics 1999 "for elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interactions in physics". His research interest can be divided in three main directions: 'gauge theories in elementary particle physics', 'quantum gravity and black holes', and 'foundational aspects of quantum mechanics'.

 


Practical Information

Begin/End

The Giersch International Symposion is a joint project of HGS-HIRe, FIAS and Stiftung Giersch. The lectures series are part of a two week symposion. Further information can be found >here

Venue

The lecture series will be conducted at FIAS, Ruth-Moufang-Str.1, 60438 Frankfurt. The website of the venue can be found >here.

Travel

Please arrange for individual travel to the location. Directions can be found >here.

Accomodation

No dedicated accomodation is organized. If you are in need for a room for the symposion please contact HGS-HIRe for advice.

Food

Lunch and coffee breaks are included in the symposion. Vegetarian options will be part of the menue. Special food requirements should be communicated to HGS-HIRe in advance.

Evening activities

In the evening social events will be organized. You will be contacted about details by individual email.
  • On Monday and Tuesday evening the Symposion's Lounge on top of the FIAS building will be open to meet fellow attendees, chat with the lecturers and enjoy a small dinner and beverages.

  • On Wednesday evening a reception in honor of the new Senior FIAS Fellow Laureatus Prof. Dr. Dr. hc mult Gerard 't Hooft will be held.

  • On Thursday evening STIFTUNG GIERSCH, FIAS and HGS-HIRe invite all participants to a visit to Museum Giersch, followed by a Dinner in a "Äbbelwoiwirtschaft" (apple-cider-pub) in Sachsenhausen. We will visit the new exhibition ARTISTS' SOJOURNS, where art historians will guide us through the exhibition in a private tour.

What to bring

The lecture week will be informal, so only casual attire is necessary. Only the reception on Wednesday evening is slightly more upscale. Please dress accordingly.

Internet

Wireless internet access is available. Please bring your own laptop.

Expenses

All basic expenses are covered by Stiftung Giersch and HGS-HIRe. All meals are included.

Insurance

Though this trip will not generate any costs for your supervisor or group please do not forget to file a trip request so you are covered by insurance during the symposion. Please ask the secretary of your official supervisor at the university for the appropriate form.
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